Last edited by Vishakar
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

11 edition of Thoreau"s ecstatic witness found in the catalog.

Thoreau"s ecstatic witness

by Alan D. Hodder

  • 272 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press in New Haven .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 -- Religion,
    • Religion and literature -- United States -- History -- 19th century

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-336) and index.

      StatementAlan D. Hodder.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPS3057.R4 H63 2001
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxix, 346 p. ;
      Number of Pages346
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3946829M
      ISBN 100300089597
      LC Control Number2001033320

      Thoreau’s Worst Nightmare the book that made his name. After years, Walden endures as a monument to frugality, solitude, and sophomore-year backpacking trips. Yet it’s Thoreau’s. Civil Government and Higher Law. In Civil Disobedience, Thoreau's basic premise is that a higher law than civil law demands the obedience of the law and government are subordinate. In cases where the two are at odds with one another, the individual must follow his conscience and, if necessary, disregard human law.

      First published in , Walden details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden Pond amidst woodland owned by his friend and mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, near Concord, : Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau's Civil Disobedience espouses the need to prioritize one's conscience over the dictates of laws. It criticizes American social institutions and policies, most prominently slavery and the Mexican-American War. Thoreau begins his essay by arguing that government rarely proves itself useful and that it derives its power from the majority because they are the strongest group, not because.

        The book, arranged chronologically, consists in a careful (bordering on obsessive) reading of Thoreau’s journals and letters, revealing a boy Author: John Kaag. The Art of Personal Witnessing Seminar Outlines Introduction The joy of witnessing to a friend about Christ and the privilege of seeing a person pass from death to life. I. You Can Witness Effectively to Individuals A. Christ promised to make you a fisher of men (Matthew ). 1. You may not be a Peter, but you can be an Andrew:File Size: KB.


Share this book
You might also like
Fingerprint test data report

Fingerprint test data report

An exhibition of the published etchings of John Crome, 1768-1821.

An exhibition of the published etchings of John Crome, 1768-1821.

Catholic Jewish relations

Catholic Jewish relations

Internal medicine; its theory and practice

Internal medicine; its theory and practice

The Nova Scotia arithmetic

The Nova Scotia arithmetic

Colonization in the Rechna Doab

Colonization in the Rechna Doab

Can you forgive her?

Can you forgive her?

Core curriculum and appraisal record for senior house officers in general (internal) medicine and the medical specialties

Core curriculum and appraisal record for senior house officers in general (internal) medicine and the medical specialties

Prehistoric man

Prehistoric man

The no-drop zone

The no-drop zone

Estimates of the population of Oklahoma counties and metropolitan areas

Estimates of the population of Oklahoma counties and metropolitan areas

Black City saint

Black City saint

Chiropractic could save your life

Chiropractic could save your life

Thoreau"s ecstatic witness by Alan D. Hodder Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau’s writings―from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which to cultivate experiences of contemplative non-attachment.

In doing so, Hodder restores to our understanding the deeper spiritual dimension of Thoreau’s life to which his writings everywhere bear by: Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau’s writings—from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which to cultivate experiences of contemplative non-attachment.

In doing so, Hodder restores to our understanding the deeper spiritual dimension of Thoreau’s life to which his writings everywhere bear witness. This book offers the first in-depth study of Thoreau's religious thought and experience.

In it Alan D. Hodder recovers the lost spiritual dimension of the writer's life, revealing a deeply religious man who, despite his rejection of organised religion, possessed a rich inner life, characterised by a sort of personal, experiential, nature-centered, and eclectic spirituality that finds wider expression in America today.5/5(3).

Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau’s writings—from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which to cultivate experiences of contemplative non-attachment.

In doing so, Hodder restores to our understanding the deeper spiritual dimension of Thoreau’s life to which his writings everywhere bear witness. Thoreau’s Ecstatic Witness. Book Description: When Henry David Thoreau died infriends and admirers remembered him as an eccentric man whose outer life was continuously fed by deeper spiritual currents.

But scholars have since focused almost exclusively on Thoreau's. Thoreau's Ecstatic Witness book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. At the heart of Thoreau's life were episodes of exhilarat /5.

Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau's writings - from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which.

Thoreau’s Ecstatic Witness Thoreau’s Ecstatic Witness Alan D. Hodder YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS/NEW HAVEN & LONDON ‘‘ ‘Ex Oriente Lux’: Thoreau’s Ecstasies and the Hindu Texts’’ appeared in Harvard Theological Review 86 (): – Hodder, Alan. Thoreau's Ecstatic Witness.

New Haven: Yale University Press, pp. Hardcover. This book offers the first in-depth study of Thoreau's religious thought and experience. In it Alan D. Hodder recovers the lost spiritual dimension of.

Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau's writings, from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived of his.

Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau's writings—from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden andthe later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which.

Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau’s writings―from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which to cultivate experiences of contemplative non-attachment.

In doing so, Hodder restores to our understanding the deeper spiritual dimension of Thoreau’s life to which his writings everywhere bear witness/5(10). Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau’s writings—from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which to cultivate experiences of contemplative non-attachment.

In doing so, Hodder restores to our understanding the deeper spiritual dimension of 5/5(3). Hodder explores these representations of ecstasy throughout Thoreau’s writings-from the riverside reflections of his first book through Walden and the later journals, when he conceived his journal writing as a spiritual discipline in itself and a kind of forum in which to cultivate experiences of contemplative : Yale University Press.

Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; J – May 6, ) was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, he is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust mater: Harvard College.

Professor Hodder looks at ecstatic experience in Thoreau's writings and shows how it was influenced by Hinduism (Bhagavad Gita, The Laws of Manu), Buddhism and Confucianism. Hodder is only the third author to offer such a major analysis of the Oriental influence on Thoreau, after Arthur Christy in s and Arthur Versluis in s.5/5.

Henry David Thoreau lived for two years, two months, and two days by Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts. His time in Walden Woods became a model of deliberate and ethical living. His words and deeds continue to inspire millions around the world who seek solutions to critical environmental and societal challenges.

Byhe had begun to set his first draft of Walden down on paper. After leaving Walden, he expanded and reworked his material repeatedly until the spring ofproducing a total of eight versions of the book.

James Munroe, publisher of A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (), originally intended to publish Walden as well. Transcendentalism Books Showing of Walden (Paperback) by. Henry David Thoreau (shelved 60 times as transcendentalism) avg rating —ratings — published Want to Read saving Want to Read Thoreau's Ecstatic Witness (Hardcover) by.

Alan D. Hodder. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Thoreau's Ecstatic Witness at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.5/5(3). 4 CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE government which they have. Governments show thus how successfully men can be imposed on, even impose on themselves, for their own advantage.

It is excellent, we must all allow; yet this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way. It does not keep the country free.Thoreau’s Journal (Part IV) I speak as a witness on the stand and tell what I have perceived.” The morning and the evening were sweet to me, and I led a life aloof from the society of men.

The wonder is that, given her book’s richness, Walls still leaves the reader eager to read Thoreau.

Her scholarly blockbuster is an awesome achievement, a merger of comprehensiveness in content with pleasure in reading. (July) Publishers Weekly "The wonder is that, given her book's richness, Walls still leaves the reader eager to read : University of Chicago Press.